Knooking: The Knit Stitch

7 Jan

The Knit Stitch

Making the knit stitch is really very easy. It is basically the same thing as a crochet slip stitch. The difference is that your stitches are held live on a cord and look like an upside down U, instead of the V that crocheters are used to seeing.

Steps:

  1. Keep your working yarn in the left hand and to the back of your project.
  2. Simply insert your hook through the stitch.
  3. Yarn over, and pull the yarn through the stitch.
  4. Ta-da, you did it!
  5. Keep working across the row, with the loops you’ve made staying on the needle, and eventually passing on to the cord (if it is a large project).
  6. When you reach the end of the row, simply slide the remaining live stitches from your needle and on to the cord.
  7. You can either remove the cord from the hook, leaving the cord in the project like a lifeline, and attach a new cord to the end of your hook. Or, you can slide the stitches closer to the end (making sure you have the clip attached), turn your work and work the next row.

Insert the hook through the stitch

Yarn over and grab the working yarn

Pull the yarn through the stitch. Ta-da!

And here is a little video I made to help walk you through the steps. Please leave me a comment if you have any questions. Thanks!

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16 Responses to “Knooking: The Knit Stitch”

  1. Stra January 8, 2010 at 4:05 am #

    I am totally TOTALLY impressed. IMPRESSED !!!

    It will feel like I’m CROCHETING “knit” fabric !! I don’t have to change my technique!

    Thank you for your efforts with the video and blog. You’ve done a great job !!

    • photojenic January 11, 2010 at 11:49 am #

      Thanks! Let me know if there is anything in particular you would like to see. I’m flying by the seat of my pants. *lol*

      • Stra January 11, 2010 at 8:28 pm #

        I suppose the next thing you’ll have to show is increasing and decreasing. Then we could pretty much make anything?

    • Sherra February 24, 2010 at 1:10 pm #

      Bless your heart, I can crochet but think the knit “fabric” looks so much better. Can’t wait to give this a try.

  2. Stra January 8, 2010 at 4:07 am #

    PS: Knooking is a great name !!

    • photojenic January 11, 2010 at 11:49 am #

      Thanks, but I can’t take the credit. Grieney was the brains behind the great name. 🙂

  3. Stra January 11, 2010 at 8:17 pm #

    I’d like more info on Grieney. Is there any?

    • photojenic January 11, 2010 at 10:03 pm #

      You can look her up on Ravelry.

  4. Jilly February 8, 2010 at 3:31 am #

    I cant wait to give this a try!
    Knitted years ago and this looks brilliant!

    excited here…lol
    Thank you for sharing

  5. smg55039 April 8, 2010 at 3:30 pm #

    You know, they make double ended crochet hooks….

    • photojenic April 10, 2010 at 9:55 pm #

      Yup, they sure do. But they can’t (as far as I know) be used for Knooking.

  6. Ashley July 20, 2010 at 9:50 pm #

    I just stumbled upon this site and the concept of knooking looks so interesting! I liked the look of knit, and as a crocheter to start, I stubbornly forced myself to learn to knit so I could make all the beautiful projects I was seeing in knit. I’ll have to try knooking!

    I would like to point out, however, that your “knit” stitch is actually a ktbl stitch (knit through back loop). it makes for a slightly twisted knit stitch. to make a true knit stitch, you would have to enter the loop with your hook from the left side, instead of the right. You probably already know this, but some who see this tutorial may not. in some knitting patterns it does make a difference. If you look on youtube for knit stitch and ktbl tutorials, you will see the difference.

  7. Ashley July 20, 2010 at 9:51 pm #

    I just stumbled upon this site and the concept of knooking looks so interesting! I liked the look of knit, and as a crocheter to start, I stubbornly forced myself to learn to knit so I could make all the beautiful projects I was seeing in knit. I’ll have to try knooking!

    I would like to point out, however, that your “knit” stitch is actually a ktbl stitch (knit through back loop). it makes for a slightly twisted knit stitch. to make a true knit stitch, you would have to enter the loop with your hook from the left side, instead of the right. You probably already know this, but some who see this tutorial may not. in some knitting patterns it does make a difference. If you look on youtube for knit stitch and ktbl tutorials, you will see the difference.

  8. Louise July 29, 2012 at 12:58 pm #

    I knit and crochet and I am OK at both. This is like knitting continental style but with the cord instead of the needle. I am failing to see the point of it as if someone can do this then they can knit the conventional way. This is not easier, it is slower as you have to pick up the stitch from the cord and that is more fiddly. It also puts strain on the hand in a way neither crochet or knitting do. It is not difficult to learn new things with some practise. It is a good idea only if you don’t have access to needles and I admire the ingenuity of it for that reason. The only good thing about it otherwise is that the stitches can be unravelled if you make a mistake and they still stay safe and that you can do a wide blanket without needing big needles and holding all the weight on your wrists. Otherwise, I think it is just best to do the actual thing. I think anyone who can go to the fiddle faddle of this can knit if they tried. If they have tried then they probably didn’t try continental style which many think is easier for crocheters. Personally I prefer the English style and yet I also crochet.

    Ashley is right, you are producing a through back of loop equivalent stitch which will look twisted when doing purl unless compensated for.

  9. brandymoore2012 November 19, 2012 at 3:40 pm #

    Where can I buy bigger knocks? I bought the kit to learn but it only goes to a 5mm, what if I want to use thicker yarn?

    Also do you know if one can knook in circles?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Garter Stitch « Knooking - January 13, 2010

    […] The Knit Stitch […]

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